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Macedonian Veterinary Review

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e-ISSN 1857-7415

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Abstract / References


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Case Report
Published 15 March 2015
 
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Quill injury - cause od death of captive indian crested porcupine(Hystrix indica, Kerr, 1792)
Tanja Švara, Irena Zdovc, Mitja Gombač, Milan Pogačnik

ABSTRACT
Indian crested porcupine (Hystrix indica) is a member of the family of Old World porcupines (Hystricidae). Its body is covered with multiple layers of quills, which serve for warning and attack if animal is threatened. However, the literature data on injuries caused by Indian crested porcupine are absent. We describe pathomorphological lesions in an Indian crested porcupine from the Ljubljana Zoo, which died after a fight with a younger male that caused a perforative quill injury of the thoracic wall, followed by septicaemia. Macroscopic, microscopic and bacteriological findings were detailed.
Key words: Indian crested porcupine (Hystrix indica), pathology, quill injury, pleuritis, septicaemia

Mac Vet Rev 2015; 38 (1): 119-122
   
[ PDF Free Article ] pdf Linija 248 KB Linija      
Available Online First: 13 February 2015
 
 
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